Is this normal with Federal Hydra-Shock 124 grain, please? - MP-Pistol Forum

Is this normal with Federal Hydra-Shock 124 grain, please?

This is a discussion on Is this normal with Federal Hydra-Shock 124 grain, please? within the MP Ammunition forums, part of the Smith & Wesson MP Forum category; Gentlemen, I shot a box of Federal Hydra-Shock 124 grain and compared to the Aguila FMJ 124 grain that I broke in my Shield 9 ...


Go Back   MP-Pistol Forum > Smith & Wesson MP Forum > MP Ammunition

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old December 24th, 2015, 05:35 PM   #1
Junior Member
 
Erminio's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: USA
Posts: 12
Is this normal with Federal Hydra-Shock 124 grain, please?

Gentlemen,
I shot a box of Federal Hydra-Shock 124 grain and compared to the Aguila FMJ 124 grain that I broke in my Shield 9 mm with, the Hydra-Shock looked more 'smokey' - the 'gun powder' smell (bear with me if I am using wrong terms, I am still learning) also was more noticeable..is it normal?
Thanks for your time, Erminio
Erminio is offline  
Old December 24th, 2015, 06:58 PM   #2
G56
Site Staff
 
G56's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Oklahoma
Posts: 8,877
Different loads often use different powders depending on the characteristics that the technicians who developed the load want, some loads call for a faster powder that burns quickly, but those often generate higher pressures than a slower burning powder, whose peak pressure happens a few milliseconds later. Some chemical formulations of powder are inherently cleaner and less smoky than others, some leave more or less residue than average. People who aren't reloaders may not know that there are easily hundreds if not thousands of different powders, and the developer of a particular round often has a dozen or more different formulations to choose from, each one has its own characteristics, different amounts of residue, and often various different odors, from not bad to outright foul. Another thing many people don't know is that loads using lead bullets generate a lot more smoke and foul the gun far faster, also the smoke from lead bullets contains a small amount of vaporized lead, nasty stuff, you don't want to breathe in any vaporized lead. Even among jacketed bullets, full metal jacket bullets often have exposed lead at the base, exposed lead at the base also means vaporized lead in the smoke, lead poisoning is nasty, you don't want any thing to do with lead poisoning. Hollow point bullets normally don't have any exposed lead at the base, as the open part of the jacket faces forward instead of backward.
G56 is offline  
Old December 24th, 2015, 11:13 PM   #3
Junior Member
 
Erminio's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: USA
Posts: 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by G56 View Post
Different loads often use different powders depending on the characteristics that the technicians who developed the load want, some loads call for a faster powder that burns quickly, but those often generate higher pressures than a slower burning powder, whose peak pressure happens a few milliseconds later. Some chemical formulations of powder are inherently cleaner and less smoky than others, some leave more or less residue than average. People who aren't reloaders may not know that there are easily hundreds if not thousands of different powders, and the developer of a particular round often has a dozen or more different formulations to choose from, each one has its own characteristics, different amounts of residue, and often various different odors, from not bad to outright foul. Another thing many people don't know is that loads using lead bullets generate a lot more smoke and foul the gun far faster, also the smoke from lead bullets contains a small amount of vaporized lead, nasty stuff, you don't want to breathe in any vaporized lead. Even among jacketed bullets, full metal jacket bullets often have exposed lead at the base, exposed lead at the base also means vaporized lead in the smoke, lead poisoning is nasty, you don't want any thing to do with lead poisoning. Hollow point bullets normally don't have any exposed lead at the base, as the open part of the jacket faces forward instead of backward.
That's useful info, thanks - now I understand why the indoor range where I go has fans blowing downrange, that is away from shooters. Regards, Erminio
Erminio is offline  
 
Old December 25th, 2015, 08:45 AM   #4
G56
Site Staff
 
G56's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Oklahoma
Posts: 8,877
Indoor air polluted by lead is a big problem with indoor ranges, proper ventilation is critical to keep lead out of the air. Also consider that indoor ranges get additional lead when the bullets hit the back stop, some lead is vaporized by the impact, again proper ventilation prevents this from becoming a problem.
G56 is offline  
Reply

  MP-Pistol Forum > Smith & Wesson MP Forum > MP Ammunition

Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Hydra-shok in a full size 9mm? demented MP Full Size Pistols 9 June 23rd, 2011 09:52 AM
Federal Premium Tactical 147 grain HST HP 9mm go bears! MP Ammunition 19 August 7th, 2008 02:50 PM
Hydra Shock?? 101Combat Vet MP Ammunition 12 May 11th, 2007 07:16 PM
Low Recoil Federal Hydra-Shoks watsoncb MP Ammunition 4 February 26th, 2007 05:53 PM
Federal .40 s/w 165 grain tactical JHP killer MP Ammunition 3 December 29th, 2006 05:51 AM



Powered by vBulletin 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright © 2006-2012 MP-Pistol. All rights reserved.
MP-Pistol is a M&P pistol enthusiast forum, but it is in no way affiliated with, nor does it represent Smith & Wesson Holding Corp. of Springfield, MA.