M2.0 Slide Stop Lever Mechanism - MP-Pistol Forum

M2.0 Slide Stop Lever Mechanism

This is a discussion on M2.0 Slide Stop Lever Mechanism within the MP Full Size Pistols forums, part of the Smith & Wesson MP Forum category; I had not previously seen any similar slide stop lever mechanism as featured on the new M&P M2.0. For good reason, as the 2016 patent ...


Go Back   MP-Pistol Forum > Smith & Wesson MP Forum > MP Full Size Pistols

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old February 22nd, 2017, 04:10 AM   #1
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Behind the tree
Posts: 1,117
M2.0 Slide Stop Lever Mechanism



I had not previously seen any similar slide stop lever mechanism as featured on the new M&P M2.0. For good reason, as the 2016 patent application for the mechanism can be viewed here.

https://patentimages.storage.googlea...60076833A1.pdf

The new design is to prevent inertial forces e.g. forceable magazine insertions from disengaging the slide stop catch and thus allowing the slide to advance into battery when it may be undesirable to occur for the operator.

I was interested more so when it became apparent that the "ambidextrous" slide stop lever was not ambidextrously useable for me as a slide stop "release" lever, as on M&P M1.0 versions. As noted in another thread the user actuator pads of the slide stop lever are not symmetrical in profile, the left side pad is larger than the right side pad allowing a little more purchase of the thumb to engage it, as such I am able to release the slide with my strong right hand thumb. I could not get enough left thumb purchase on the right side pad to a release the slide with my support hand only. To increase the right side pad profile, I cannabilized a M1.0 slide stop and grafted it on to the M2.0 right pad to improve my situation. J-B weld was used to secure the parts; the added profile is .001-.002" thinner than the left side; its presence did not interfere with a closely fitted 7TS Safariland holster.

I have not yet found any right hand shooter that can disengage the slide stop lever using only their support left hand thumb.
Some may have better ideas how to enhance the actuator pad on the right side to accomplish the goal.

















Caution: Pseudo-science and / or amateur photos may be embedded in this post.

Last edited by mp9werks; February 22nd, 2017 at 06:52 AM.
mp9werks is offline  
Old February 22nd, 2017, 07:50 AM   #2
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Ohio
Posts: 19
If you're interested. I recently made a video on this very issue. This link will take you to it:
SharpshooterOPD is offline  
Old February 22nd, 2017, 08:58 AM   #3
G56
Site Staff
 
G56's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Oklahoma
Posts: 8,873
Quote:
Originally Posted by SharpshooterOPD View Post
If you're interested. I recently made a video on this very issue. This link will take you to it: https://youtu.be/QXOZu0M65uQ
Well done!
G56 is offline  
 
Old February 22nd, 2017, 09:56 AM   #4
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Ohio
Posts: 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by G56 View Post
Well done!
Thank you!
SharpshooterOPD is offline  
Old February 22nd, 2017, 09:56 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Behind the tree
Posts: 1,117
Quote:
Originally Posted by SharpshooterOPD View Post
If you're interested.....
Thanks for the link, however myself and many others are quite well versed in alternative methods to load semi-auto's with using one hand.

Besides to highlight a new patent pending design for the M2.0, the intent in part, for the posting was to be critical of a design advertised as "ambidextrous" when in fact the parts are not symmetrical in dimensions or for utility; if the "ambidextrous magazine release" or the forward cocking serrations were not symmetrical, affording a better manner of engagement on one side of the pistol than the other depending on your dominant handedness, that too would be a criticism.

To quell in advance the ever-desired semantic debate of what manufacturers call the lever on the side of the slide (Stop v. Release), it goes both ways and its use is a well-recognized manner in which to safely advance a slide into battery.

Here's the XD Manual labeling the lever as "Slide Stop" yet
advocate "releasing" it to move the slide into battery.



The H&K makes no bones about naming it:



There are countless examples of terminology being interchangeable as well as function referencing the same lever !

The second reason for posting, despite the new design it can still be defeated by excessive application of magazine inertia; as recognized by S&W in their M2.0 Manual:



Finally, the final reason for posting was to perhaps elicit other ideas as to better enhance the right side actuator pad, as its named in the patent application, for the user. I anticipate this part will be revised for M3.0.

Those desiring to discuss how-to-load or gun nomenclature conflicts please start your separate thread on the topic.

Thanks.

Caution: Pseudo-science and / or amateur photos may be embedded in this post.

Last edited by mp9werks; February 22nd, 2017 at 12:53 PM.
mp9werks is offline  
Old February 22nd, 2017, 10:58 AM   #6
G56
Site Staff
 
G56's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Oklahoma
Posts: 8,873
Some pistols are designed so the slide stop can be used as a release, the 1911 is a prime example. If you look at the slide stop or release on a 1911, especially the original design and not one of the custom levers, it is clearly designed to push DOWN and there is virtually no attempt to help the shooter push it up.

The M&P is exactly the opposite, it is designed to push UP, not down, and the ambidextrous design is designed so you can push it up from either side, no attempt at all is made to make it easier to push down. In some of the owner's manuals, they vary somewhat, it says to pull the side to the rear, then push the slide stop down to unlock it, the key point there is that they tell you to pull the slide to the rear first, thus taking all the strain off the release.
G56 is offline  
Old February 22nd, 2017, 12:13 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Behind the tree
Posts: 1,117
The two modifications illustrated:

1. Enlarging the right side actuator pad
2. Slight radius / polishing of the left side slide stop engagement surface

will allow one to easily use the right / left side lever single-handed as a release lever without affecting its M&P namesake purpose i.e. slide stop.




The sharp geometry area of the slide stop engagement before modification.


Caution: Pseudo-science and / or amateur photos may be embedded in this posting.

Last edited by mp9werks; February 22nd, 2017 at 12:34 PM.
mp9werks is offline  
Old February 22nd, 2017, 12:30 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Washington State - +-94mi east of the Cascade Curtain
Posts: 742
Mp9werks,

Did affixing the the M1.0's pad to the M2.0's pad make it so it would release the slide?

I've been studying mine since the day I bought it to see why it won't release too. Press down on the right side slide stop as hard as I might it will not release the slide, however I did notice the right side thumb pad was in fact moving down, but failing to release the slide.

If I remove the slide and move the slide stop to the position it would be in with the slide locked open I can push the right side slide stop down and it will also snap the left side down.

I've come to the conclusion the slide stop framework itself is flexing. I think the pressure of the recoil rod assembly and the left side thumb pad having to push the spring loaded anti-auto-forward mechanism down as it slides over it, there is just too much flex in the slide stop framework for it to release the slide.

EDIT TO ADD: I was typing my post when
Mp9werks was posting his, he answered my question.

Last edited by NCW Ray; February 22nd, 2017 at 12:36 PM.
NCW Ray is offline  
Old February 22nd, 2017, 12:39 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Behind the tree
Posts: 1,117
^^^
I think the prior post will answer your questions.

I too noticed that with only an enlarged pad, the slide stop assembly would flex as you observed, only slightly but insufficient to impart the required force to disengage the sharp edge of the slide stop tab from the slide. Combined with the minor fitting mentioned it's quite easy now. I only took 1-2 swipes at a time with a fine file then checked for satisfactory function each time, until just right.

For those interested in modifying parts, remember always modify the least expensive / most available part FIRST ! in this case the slide stop assembly, never the slide.

Caution: Pseudo-science and /or amateur photos may be embedded in this post.
mp9werks is offline  
Old February 22nd, 2017, 01:23 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Washington State - +-94mi east of the Cascade Curtain
Posts: 742
Quote:
Originally Posted by mp9werks View Post
^^^
I think the prior post will answer your questions.

I too noticed that with only an enlarged pad, the slide stop assembly would flex as you observed, only slightly but insufficient to impart the required force to disengage the sharp edge of the slide stop tab from the slide. Combined with the minor fitting mentioned it's quite easy now. I only took 1-2 swipes at a time with a fine file then checked for satisfactory function each time, until just right.

For those interested in modifying parts, remember always modify the least expensive / most available part FIRST ! in this case the slide stop assembly, never the slide.

Caution: Pseudo-science and /or amateur photos may be embedded in this post.
I might try to radius and polish the slide stop tab...but not until I have a replacement in hand when I screw it up!
NCW Ray is offline  
Old February 22nd, 2017, 10:45 PM   #11
Member
 
ThrowinRocks's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: TX
Posts: 34
Maybe I'm wrong but is the notch cut out for the Slide catch only on the left side of the Slide which makes it easy for right handed shooters to manipulate but there's no notch cut out on the right side of the Slide which would cause you to use more force to make it release?

My P320 has notches cut out on both sides of the slide for the slide catch to work properly.

Last edited by ThrowinRocks; February 22nd, 2017 at 11:15 PM.
ThrowinRocks is offline  
Old February 23rd, 2017, 02:05 AM   #12
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Behind the tree
Posts: 1,117
^^^^
The M1.0 also only has a left side slide stop engagement notch, just like the M2.0 and many other brands.

When a commonly designed slide stop spring assembly is used to return the slide stop lever downward the operator only has to overcome a small compression ( few thousandths of an inch before the parts no longer are engaged) of the guide rod spring to overcome the friction between the slide stop and the slide notch; the spring actuation then directs the slide stop tab immediately downward to no longer obstruct forward slide movement under the power of the guide rod spring.

The M2.0 has a unique method that requires the slide to move rearward ~ 5/32" so that the cam shaped tab on the slide stop lever is driven down below the level of the slide notch, before the slide can be advanced forward; this ~5/32", 7 X the distance of the M1.0, requires even greater compression of the 17-18 lb guide rod spring (that is already compressed with the slide locked back)....this is the new greater force to deal with one-thumbed on small engagement pads ! A good analogy would be the complaint that it is hard to insert a fully-loaded magazine when the slide is in battery, compressing that magazine spring just a little bit more when it is already very much compressed can be difficult for some.

The point of this discussion is that the M2.0 slide stop mechanism design intentions to reduce the likelihood of uncertain magazine inertia slide release has the unintended ? consequence, for those desiring to employ single hand manipulation of the R / L slide stop actuator pads, quite difficult. Alternative methods of loading one-handed will also require more force to advance the slide into battery.





Caution: Pseudo-science and / or amateur photos may be embedded in this post.

Last edited by mp9werks; February 23rd, 2017 at 03:45 AM.
mp9werks is offline  
Old February 25th, 2017, 06:10 AM   #13
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Behind the tree
Posts: 1,117
For those not wishing to modify their gun, one solution that may work for you to one-hand release the slide stop levers involves placing your thumb and index finger on the rear surface of each actuator pad and depressing them simultaneously. Give it a try and see if it helps.

mp9werks is offline  
Old February 25th, 2017, 06:40 AM   #14
Member
 
ThrowinRocks's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: TX
Posts: 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by mp9werks View Post
^^^^
The M1.0 also only has a left side slide stop engagement notch, just like the M2.0 and many other brands.

When a commonly designed slide stop spring assembly is used to return the slide stop lever downward the operator only has to overcome a small compression ( few thousandths of an inch before the parts no longer are engaged) of the guide rod spring to overcome the friction between the slide stop and the slide notch; the spring actuation then directs the slide stop tab immediately downward to no longer obstruct forward slide movement under the power of the guide rod spring.

The M2.0 has a unique method that requires the slide to move rearward ~ 5/32" so that the cam shaped tab on the slide stop lever is driven down below the level of the slide notch, before the slide can be advanced forward; this ~5/32", 7 X the distance of the M1.0, requires even greater compression of the 17-18 lb guide rod spring (that is already compressed with the slide locked back)....this is the new greater force to deal with one-thumbed on small engagement pads ! A good analogy would be the complaint that it is hard to insert a fully-loaded magazine when the slide is in battery, compressing that magazine spring just a little bit more when it is already very much compressed can be difficult for some.

The point of this discussion is that the M2.0 slide stop mechanism design intentions to reduce the likelihood of uncertain magazine inertia slide release has the unintended ? consequence, for those desiring to employ single hand manipulation of the R / L slide stop actuator pads, quite difficult. Alternative methods of loading one-handed will also require more force to advance the slide into battery.





Caution: Pseudo-science and / or amateur photos may be embedded in this post.
I don't feel it's the notch being as much an issue as I do the NEW way the slide stop functions. It basically works opposite of the way the 1.0 slide stop worked.

This video really details the new vs old.

ThrowinRocks is offline  
Old March 6th, 2017, 03:34 PM   #15
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Behind the tree
Posts: 1,117
After 1500 rounds the JB weld failed and jettisoned the piggy-backed extra release pad.

A 5-40 torx screw with knurled head placed ; located rearward and low to maximize leverage advantage; it isn't coming loose.

The slide stop is extraordinarily hardened; drilling & tapping is not for the kitchen table gunsmith !



Last edited by mp9werks; March 6th, 2017 at 04:12 PM.
mp9werks is offline  
Reply

  MP-Pistol Forum > Smith & Wesson MP Forum > MP Full Size Pistols


Search tags for this page

m&p m2.0 slide stop

Click on a term to search for related topics.

Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Looking for latest gen slide stop. Lostinthewoods MP Gunsmithing 12 April 22nd, 2017 07:09 AM
M&P 2.0 Differences I See mp9werks MP Full Size Pistols 35 April 21st, 2017 01:34 PM
Weak Slide Stop Spring MrDonivan MP Gunsmithing 0 December 24th, 2016 11:58 AM



Powered by vBulletin 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright © 2006-2012 MP-Pistol. All rights reserved.
MP-Pistol is a M&P pistol enthusiast forum, but it is in no way affiliated with, nor does it represent Smith & Wesson Holding Corp. of Springfield, MA.