FP Plunger Spring - MP-Pistol Forum

FP Plunger Spring

This is a discussion on FP Plunger Spring within the MP Full Size Pistols forums, part of the Smith & Wesson MP Forum category; When installing a new Firing Pin Plunger Spring that resides below the rear sight, should the pistol be cocked or not....


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Old April 2nd, 2017, 07:29 PM   #1
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Question FP Plunger Spring

When installing a new Firing Pin Plunger Spring that resides below the rear sight, should the pistol be cocked or not.
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Old April 2nd, 2017, 09:09 PM   #2
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Welcome to our little corner of the web! I moved your post to a better area for a technical answer, the NEW USERS forum is really intended for welcomes, not technical questions.

The plunger is normally serviced with the slide off the frame, so that would not be cocked, although I don't know if it makes any difference or not, but as mentioned such things are normally done with the slide off the pistol frame.
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Old April 3rd, 2017, 04:20 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by G56 View Post
Welcome to our little corner of the web! I moved your post to a better area for a technical answer, the NEW USERS forum is really intended for welcomes, not technical questions.

The plunger is normally serviced with the slide off the frame, so that would not be cocked, although I don't know if it makes any difference or not, but as mentioned such things are normally done with the slide off the pistol frame.
It's definitely not something that should be attempted with the pistol assembled.
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Old April 4th, 2017, 02:46 PM   #4
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Well as long as you have assured yourself the gun is unloaded and safe to work on it doesn't matter whether the striker is cocked or not; it also doesn't matter if the gun is assembled or not.

However, the rear sight does have to be moved over (generally to the right side of the slide) enough in the sight dovetail to expose the striker blocking plunger spring that is lying beneath the disc that protects the end of the spring from the undersurface of the rear sight. I say it doesn't matter as to whether the gun is assembled because if you can secure the assembled gun into a protective vise sufficiently to move the sights have at it; most would prefer to remove the slide from the frame and then either use a punch-hammer-vise routine or dedicated sight tool to move the sight, just because it's an easier evolution.

Caution: Pseudo-science and / or amateur photos may be embedded in this post.

Last edited by mp9werks; April 4th, 2017 at 02:51 PM.
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Old April 4th, 2017, 07:40 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mp9werks View Post
Well as long as you have assured yourself the gun is unloaded and safe to work on it doesn't matter whether the striker is cocked or not; it also doesn't matter if the gun is assembled or not.

However, the rear sight does have to be moved over (generally to the right side of the slide) enough in the sight dovetail to expose the striker blocking plunger spring that is lying beneath the disc that protects the end of the spring from the undersurface of the rear sight. I say it doesn't matter as to whether the gun is assembled because if you can secure the assembled gun into a protective vise sufficiently to move the sights have at it; most would prefer to remove the slide from the frame and then either use a punch-hammer-vise routine or dedicated sight tool to move the sight, just because it's an easier evolution.

Caution: Pseudo-science and / or amateur photos may be embedded in this post.
I don't think putting a polymer frame in a vise to secure the pistol is a good idea. Neither do I think that odd shaped polymer frame would make a secure base to work from when using a sight pusher attached to the slide.

I other words; I don't know anyone, professional smith, kitchen table DYI guy, or anyone else, that would think leaving a pistol assembled while working on it is the preferred method.

I mean damn!

When I post responses to questions, I keep in mind that there will no doubt be folks reading them that may have little to no experience in working on guns...

Last edited by Rick M; April 4th, 2017 at 07:43 PM.
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Old April 5th, 2017, 05:45 AM   #6
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Let's just review the conversation so far.

The OP desired to remove just a firing block plunger spring, for whatever reason.

Here is the tasking at hand, remove rear sight, remove protective disc, firing block plunger spring removed, insert new one, done!



Then statements were made:

"although I don't know if it makes any difference or not"
*
"It's definitely not something that should be attempted with the pistol assembled"
*
I stated: "most would prefer to remove the slide from the frame".

For those that don't know, for this particular task under discussion, it does NOT make any difference if the slide is removed from the frame or the cocked condition of the striker. It's baseless-in-fact to suggest that it should not be attempted with the pistol assembled, particularly when is neither unsafe or complicated by doing so.

This is not calculus.
There are countless examples when a simple solution to a task will succeed when it appears on the surface some existing geometry contour prohibits it from being executed.

If using a vise, the simplicity of properly-sized jaw inserts excludes the problem of the fact the frame grip is wider than the slide. Several of the inserts shown below could be used, however using correct size wood ones avoids even the simplest step of the need to tape-protect the sides of the slide!













For those with a dedicated sight tool its even easier, especially on a M&P M2.0 because the frame lacks a beaver tail shortening it by 0.03"!
No inserts, no taping etc.

The slide is secured and supported in the same manner by this MGW specific M&P device whether the slide is mounted to the frame or not. In fact, doing such saves the individual the need to:
1. remove the slide from the frame
2. remove the guide rod spring assembly & barrel
3. protect and tape the slide
4. secure in a vise
and then not having to reverse the steps after the task is completed. That's 8 steps saved.







You are welcome.

Class dismissed.

Caution: Pseudo-science and / or amateur photos may be embedded in this post.

Last edited by mp9werks; April 5th, 2017 at 08:45 AM.
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Old April 5th, 2017, 05:57 AM   #7
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I prefer to just take the slide off the frame to do ANY sight replacement... its just common sense.
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Old April 5th, 2017, 06:21 AM   #8
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Well, in this instance the task was the manner in which to do it on a M&P rear sight, not just any sight because it is common sense that this solution is not a universal one. Just clever time-saving options in this instance.

Preferences respected.

Last edited by mp9werks; April 5th, 2017 at 06:30 AM.
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Old April 5th, 2017, 06:33 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mp9werks View Post
Well, in this instance the task was the manner in which to do it on a M&P rear sight, not just any sight because it is common sense that this solution is not a universal one. Just clever options in this instance.

Preferences respected.
Yes sir mp9... and i agree, though not a preferred method in my opinion, (for me personally), it does work. The way my own luck goes, i would do damage to the frame innocently... (old eye`s dont see as good these days) so thats my main reason for taking the slide right off the gun...lol.
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Old April 5th, 2017, 07:05 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mp9werks View Post
Let's just review the conversation so far.

The OP desired to remove just a firing block plunger spring, for whatever reason.

Here is the tasking at hand, remove rear sight, remove protective disc, firing block plunger spring removed, insert new one, done!



Then statements were made:

"although I don't know if it makes any difference or not"
*
"It's definitely not something that should be attempted with the pistol assembled"
*
I stated: "most would prefer to remove the slide from the frame".

For those that don't know, for this particular task under discussion, it does NOT make any difference if the slide is removed from the frame or the cocked condition of the striker. It's baseless-in-fact to suggest that it should not be attempted with the pistol assembled, particularly when is neither unsafe or complicated by doing so.

This is not calculus.
There are countless examples when a simple solution to a task will succeed when it appears on the surface some existing geometry contour prohibits it from being executed.

If using a vise, the simplicity of properly-sized jaw inserts excludes the problem of the fact the frame grip is wider than the slide. Several of the inserts shown below could be used, however using correct size wood ones avoids even the simplest step of the need to tape-protect the sides of the slide!













For those with a dedicated sight tool its even easier, especially on a M&P M2.0 because the frame lacks a beaver tail shortening it by 03"!
No inserts, no taping etc.

The slide is secured and supported in the same manner by this MGW specific M&P device whether the slide is mounted to the frame or not. In fact, doing such saves the individual the need to:
1. remove the slide from the frame
2. remove the guide rod spring assembly & barrel
3. protect and tape the slide
4. secure in a vise
and then not having to reverse the steps after the task is completed. That's 8 steps saved.







You are welcome.

Class dismissed.



Caution: Pseudo-science and / or amateur photos may be embedded in this post.
Yeah; I'm sure the OP has a vise, sight pusher, and all the nifty little pieces of oak ready to go.

I'll bet that if he did, he wouldn't be on here asking the question to begin with.

Nice photos, anyway.
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Old April 5th, 2017, 08:42 PM   #11
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How much time does it take to remove the slide? If time saving is the benefit, then thats kind of silly. I say its your gun, do it however you can get it done and not screw it up and be mad at yourself later.
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Old April 6th, 2017, 07:31 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Flash 80 View Post
How much time does it take to remove the slide? If time saving is the benefit, then thats kind of silly. I say its your gun, do it however you can get it done and not screw it up and be mad at yourself later.
About 2-3 seconds.
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Old April 6th, 2017, 08:58 AM   #13
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The only reason I responded to this thread was to challenge nonsense statements based on uninformed opinions that then get promulgated ad infinitum as some gunsmith gospel. No need to ruminate on the specific individual ones.

I use photos to clearly illustrate the manner in which the process could safely and easily be performed for those who might choose to do so. Further, they clearly debunk the expressed opinions that it couldn't be done or it is difficult to perform. For the OP's tasking, the rear sight is going to be removed, a vise or a sight tool will be required; some may now know you can use 2 inexpensive wood vise jaw inserts to assist in accomplishing the task. Also, as shown the polymer frame is not used as the basis for the sight pusher, just secured to the slide as it always is.

A time-savings was noted only to highlight a secondary gain in this instance. Perhaps there is a video illustrating how the slide-frame is going to be disassembled, barrel & guide rod removed, slide tape protected and all those steps reversed in 2-3 seconds.

Surprisingly, even experienced gun-toting individuals can learn something new from other experienced individuals. The OP is their own best judge as to their individual capabilities. When I post responses its not my role to vet the OP as to what tools they may have at their disposal, nor their level of expertise, rather just try to clearly show to anyone interested a safe and effective manner in which to perform the task. I am pretty sure I accomplished that goal in this instance.

If anyone else has photo's or videos of how it can't be done on an M&P I am interested.

I am done with this thread.

Caution: Pseudo-science and / or amateur photos may be embedded in this post.

Last edited by mp9werks; April 6th, 2017 at 09:20 AM.
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