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Cleaning Frequency for HD Gun

This is a discussion on Cleaning Frequency for HD Gun within the MP Reference forums, part of the Smith & Wesson MP Forum category; Originally Posted by JeffWard I clean my carry gun when the inside of my shirt starts getting dirty from the residue... Kidding. I shoot my ...


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Old June 8th, 2011, 07:38 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffWard View Post
I clean my carry gun when the inside of my shirt starts getting dirty from the residue...



Kidding.



I shoot my competition gun (Pro 9) much more than my carry gun (9c),so it gets cleaned more. I'll wipe it down externally, and snake the bore about every trip., but I don't do a serious tear-down cleaning more than once every 1000 rounds or so. Every other month...



My carry gun has fewer rounds... 1000-2000, vs my competition gun's 25,000-30,000... but it gets sweaty and lint-filled. I blow out the lint, and wipe it down with CLP frequently, but only clean it thoroughly every 3 months or so...



Jeff


When you say "serious tear-down cleaning" are you referring to something more than a field strip?
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Old June 9th, 2011, 11:06 PM   #17
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I shoot about 100-200 rounds per range visit. I dry bore snake every time. Every 500-600 rounds I oil the slide points and spring. I'm new to this, but was also told that cleaning this type of gun too much = dirt collector. Is this true? I'm comfortable with this method, so far, and have fired my 9c for about 1000 rounds. No malfunctions. Please let me know if I do this type of method, when should I break it down for a good cleaning? I was thinking every 2000 rounds.
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Old June 19th, 2011, 06:14 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by flyboy1313 View Post
I shoot about 100-200 rounds per range visit. I dry bore snake every time. Every 500-600 rounds I oil the slide points and spring. I'm new to this, but was also told that cleaning this type of gun too much = dirt collector. Is this true? I'm comfortable with this method, so far, and have fired my 9c for about 1000 rounds. No malfunctions. Please let me know if I do this type of method, when should I break it down for a good cleaning? I was thinking every 2000 rounds.


Like you, I have gone 1000 rounds without cleaning an M&P and had no problems. However I find that if you wait that long, when you DO finally clean it, you end up spending more time because of how dirty it is. However, that was a range/competition M&P. The ones i carry or keep by the bedside I keep clean between range trips.
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Old June 19th, 2011, 06:26 PM   #19
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When people say "break it down" to clean it, are you just talking about a field strip, or something more intensive?
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Old June 20th, 2011, 07:46 PM   #20
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Originally Posted by MaddMax View Post
Old military too. You take care of your weapon it will take care of you. It doesn't hurt to clean it after your trip to the range. My old thought has always been, if you get into the shit, how long until you CAN clean it again that last cleaning might have to last awhile (depending on how safe you are), if it hits the fan hard enough.


Fixed your spelling mistake Actually not a bad way to think about it, especially if you have more than 3 guns. Another thing is if you don't do it all the time, which I don't, and you own 4-6+ and take out numerous ones when you shoot you might forget the last time you cleaned it. Of course you could always use RangeLog and keep track.





Quote:
Originally Posted by flyboy1313 View Post
I shoot about 100-200 rounds per range visit. I dry bore snake every time. Every 500-600 rounds I oil the slide points and spring. I'm new to this, but was also told that cleaning this type of gun too much = dirt collector. Is this true? I'm comfortable with this method, so far, and have fired my 9c for about 1000 rounds. No malfunctions. Please let me know if I do this type of method, when should I break it down for a good cleaning? I was thinking every 2000 rounds.


I'd say cleaning it too much with oil, it will collect more dust. However that depends on where you store it also. I really like using the Otis Tactical cleaning kit. Instead of pushing the crap back in you pull it out. I think using a Boresnake is also good at times. Especially if you go out and plan on shooting more than 200-300 rounds. Also using a PC air duster in between when you fully clean it, or "break it down" is also a good idea. Maybe could use the compressed air on your magazines?



Of course like RockBottom asked, does "break it down" involve really taking it down, even to the sear housing and cleaning the springs in there or... ?



I don't think there is a need to clean it if you go out and shoot 100 rounds per time, unless you do it every three months. Then I'd think it would be a good idea to lightly oil things up, especially when it's more humid in the summer. 2,000 rounds is way too much though if your using it as a CCW or a HD one and you don't shoot it that much, again for humidity reasons (ie rusting internally where you can't see things).



Now that I wrote this out and reread your post I'd say your 100-200 rounds and bore-snaking it is good enough. Then clean it with oil every 500-600 rounds and then break it down every 1000 to 1500 is a good idea. But if I shot 100-200 rounds 3-4 times a month, I'd just use the Otis system and clean it once a month. But after the first month fully strip it and see how it looks inside, including the sear housing. If your going to be using the same ammo then you might want to fully break it down every two months with around 1,000 rounds it, or maybe you could easily go every 1,500 rounds to 2,000 rounds before you had to fully take it apart and check out the sear housing. Apparently if you have the older sear housing with that much smaller spring and plunger, you might get more crud in it and want to always do it every 1,000-1,500 rounds no matter what.



Full disclosure, I just got the newer sear housing and hope I'll receive the FSS and trigger by the end of the week and go shoot my M&P9L for the 1st time. The trigger was so bad and gritty that after shooting 3-4 M&P mfgr reps guns, over the last few years with many rounds through them and hence had good broken in triggers. I just wanted to wait for the FSS and trigger and do it right. My G23 which I sold for the XDM9, which I just sold for the M&P9L both had noticeably better triggers (got both with under 300 rounds). At least now that I tweaked my new Browning Buckmarks trigger, hopefully right, essentially I'll get to shoot two new guns
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Old June 21st, 2011, 06:35 AM   #21
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For a Home Defense gun that isn't carried, cleaning after every range trip is NOT paranoia. You obviously take pride in your firearms and you should continue to do so. It gives you confidence that the pistol is at its maximum potential.



Now sometimes in the hustle and bustle of life we get complacent and we may not feel like we have the time or more importantly, the energy to clean our guns regularly. At the very least you must keep your bore clear. It doesn't need to be spotless but you should always run either a snake or some patches and a little oil after each range trip. These guns will fire even if they are dry and dirty but if the bore is fouled the gun can become dangerous to the shooter. My M&P FS has been dry and dirty for many months but always has a clean bore. I don't use this gun for any kind of defense and so far, after 1000rnds, have had no issues with it going bang.



Sometimes our carry guns don't get as much attention as we think they do. Sure you may clean it after every range trip. You may have in spotless condition, and boy does it feel smooth when you rack the slide from all the oil applied to it. But most carry guns aren't shot regularly and spend most of their lives stuck into a holster. Extra oil will pick up dirt, lint and other debris. Doubly so if you're carrying IWB. For my carry guns I like to give them a thorough cleaning and apply oil/lubrication as normal then work the action several times then field strip and with a clean cloth, wiping off any visible oil. What oil is left is plenty to keep the gun cycling for a few hundred rounds, which I imagine (I have no facts) is much more than the average self defense engagement for a civilian. As a civilian, if I get to the point where I'm at slide lock and performing a speed reload I have definitely sailed past that line of self defense and straight into a full on firefight (relatively speaking). Not something I should have gotten myself into in the first place. At that point I've most likely made a chain of bad decisions, not good.



I digress. I apologize.



In-short. Its not paranoia to clean your gun. Cleaning after every range trip is a great habit to have. Remember though, don't lose all confidence in the gun just because you haven't cleaned it since your last range trip 5 days ago. If you've got a backup gun for HD, try going several range trips without a cleaning as an experiment. Just remember to keep that bore clean!
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Old August 5th, 2011, 03:20 PM   #22
 
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I generally clean my carry gun every month, more often if it get taken to the range.



Anytime one of my guns gets shot, it gets cleaned. It may not be immediately when I get home from the range, but within a week it will get cleaned. A normal range trip for me is 100 to 150 rounds with pistols; half that if I'm shooting a rifle or shotgun.
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Old August 30th, 2011, 07:39 AM   #23
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Originally Posted by metalman8600 View Post
You don't want to overclean the gun. That wouldn't be good.



What I generally do after a trip to the range is I run a Boresnake down the barrel, clean the feed ramp, and oil the rails. That's it. That's just for peace of mind. I know that even if I shot 5000 rounds through it, it would still work flawlessly.



These modern guns will run for thousands of rounds without any cleaning at all.




I typically clean all my guns after every range trip but I am starting to change my ways. Now I do what you do...a boresnake down the barrel, an external wipedown, and some new oil on the rails. I think most guns will perform fine with this treatment. I noticed that my 1911 which I sometimes compete with shoots better without cleaning, so I run 300 rounds through it a few days before I have a shoot and then dont clean it.



I read an article about the M&P by David Bahde, who is a SWAT officer and he wrote that he purposely didnt clean his M&P for the first 5000 rounds (dont know if this was his issue weapon or not), and it performed flawlessly. I dont know if I would go that long but it obviously didnt cause a problem.



With other guns, the finish concerns me so I always wipe them down. My new M&P hasnt arrived yet but I think the finish is so durable I wont even bother with a wipedown after shooting. Boresnake and a little oil, and it goes back in the safe.



My two cents



230grain
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Old August 30th, 2011, 10:47 AM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RockBottom View Post
When you say "serious tear-down cleaning" are you referring to something more than a field strip?


Yes.



Every few months (5000 rounds), I'll break the gun down entirely, to its components. I'll drop all the metal parts in solvent/cleaner like Hoppes, and let them soak a bit. The parts that need it will get a stiff nylon brush (old toothbrush), and a rinse in CLP. Then I'll check everything for cracks, wear, etc. This habit comes from shooting ARs where you have to check the bolt carrier components, extractor, bolt lugs, etc for wear. ARs experience MUCH higher forces and wear than a pistol shooting target loads, but it's a habit. I usually do both my AR and M&P at the same time. Then I'll swap out worn springs (recoil/mag/trigger return) and put everything back together. Then I know it's "better than new", just as clean, but fully broken in. I'll run 20-30 through it before my next match to assure everything went back as it should, and then go shoot it!



Field-strip, chamber/ramp clean, and lube every 300-500 rounds... Complete tear-down every 5000.



Understand most gun owners won't put 5000 rounds through a gun as long as they own it... My last M&P had 35,000-40,000 rounds through it, and I sold it for damn near RETAIL. These guns are flawless when maintained.



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Old August 30th, 2011, 12:56 PM   #25
 
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Originally Posted by 230grain View Post
With other guns, the finish concerns me so I always wipe them down. My new M&P hasnt arrived yet but I think the finish is so durable I wont even bother with a wipedown after shooting.
My carry M&P has had several rust spots, both on the slide and the takedown lever. It's about a year of carry in a kydex holster including jogging during the summer, with around 2-3k rounds through it including several IDPA matches.



The finish is good, but it's far from indestructible.
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Old January 23rd, 2012, 09:51 AM   #26
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Originally Posted by Runn.Gunner View Post
Yes.



Every few months (5000 rounds), I'll break the gun down entirely, to its components. I'll drop all the metal parts in solvent/cleaner like Hoppes, and let them soak a bit. The parts that need it will get a stiff nylon brush (old toothbrush), and a rinse in CLP. Then I'll check everything for cracks, wear, etc. This habit comes from shooting ARs where you have to check the bolt carrier components, extractor, bolt lugs, etc for wear. ARs experience MUCH higher forces and wear than a pistol shooting target loads, but it's a habit. I usually do both my AR and M&P at the same time. Then I'll swap out worn springs (recoil/mag/trigger return) and put everything back together. Then I know it's "better than new", just as clean, but fully broken in. I'll run 20-30 through it before my next match to assure everything went back as it should, and then go shoot it!



Field-strip, chamber/ramp clean, and lube every 300-500 rounds... Complete tear-down every 5000.



Understand most gun owners won't put 5000 rounds through a gun as long as they own it... My last M&P had 35,000-40,000 rounds through it, and I sold it for damn near RETAIL. These guns are flawless when maintained.



JeffWard


New guy here... shopping for first handgun.



The wife and I went to a local gun shop over the weekend and the guy behind the counter said the M&P pistols require a $200 tool to remove the rear sights which is required for a complete tear down and cleaning.



Is this true?



Thanks in advance,

Steve
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Old January 23rd, 2012, 10:04 AM   #27
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Originally Posted by sdg View Post
The wife and I went to a local gun shop over the weekend and the guy behind the counter said the M&P pistols require a $200 tool to remove the rear sights which is required for a complete tear down and cleaning.



Is this true?


Mostly there is no need to do more than field strip to clean an M&P



As for tearing down; $200 tool, no... Its is nice to have, but one will still need a punch and hammer set to disassemble the M&P. A brass punch and a hammer will easily drift out the rear sight without the need for an expensive rear sight tool. A mat is recommended.
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Old January 23rd, 2012, 10:14 AM   #28
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Got it. Thank you the quick response.



Quote:
Originally Posted by jasonuscg View Post
As for tearing down; $200 tool, no... Its is nice to have, but one will still need a punch and hammer set to disassemble the M&P. A brass punch and a hammer will easily drift out the rear sight without the need for an expensive rear sight tool.


Is this the same for most semi-autos? On the Glocks, for example?
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Old January 23rd, 2012, 10:35 AM   #29
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Originally Posted by super wabbit View Post
For a Home Defense gun that isn't carried, cleaning after every range trip is NOT paranoia. You obviously take pride in your firearms and you should continue to do so. It gives you confidence that the pistol is at its maximum potential. ....ort... Its not paranoia to clean your gun. Cleaning after every range trip is a great habit to have. Remember though, don't lose all confidence in the gun just because you haven't cleaned it since your last range trip 5 days ago. If you've got a backup gun for HD, try going several range trips without a cleaning as an experiment. Just remember to keep that bore clean!


I agree wholeheartedly. First, your firearm should operated just fine, without cleaning after a range trip, unless you put a couple of thousand rounds down the tube over a day or two.



But here's my take on it. I guess it's ingrained from 20 years in the military, but I clean mine after every range trip. There have been times when I was just so tired from lack of rest, or distracted by other pressing things, that I let it slide, but I'll get to it first chance the next day. I know this is an old statement, but my philosophy is this: Clean your weapon every chance you get, because you don't know when the next chance, and under what circumstances, you'll need a clean weapon or have a chance to clean it. I takes very little effort to clean an M&P, and a few pistols are a bear to clean, but it's not like you're operating a jack hammer, it just doesn't take that much effort. In fact, and I know this might seem silly to some, but if I put a weapon away dirty, I can't keep that nagging thought out of my mind, until I get it cleaned. I may be a little "anal" about it, but I always have a clean weapon.



Once it's cleaned, and assuming you're not goint to fire it for a while, and store the weapon, say for months or maybe a year, it doesn't hurt to run a patch through the bore every so often, in a dry storage climate, if you live in a "wet" or "humid" area, and don't have a climate controlled safe, or are storing it in your closet, I'd pull it out at least once a month and run a wet patch through it, as a rust preventative, and maybe your favorite type of protective (rem oil or whatever you like) light wipe down of your favorite protectant on the outside of you're weapon.



Since my black rifles are Gas DI, they get a thourough cleaning after every trip to the range, no later than the next day, with special attention to getting all the crud off the BCG, and a pipe cleaner up the gas tube. the barrel, at least spray out with gun scrubber the lower and lube, and don't forget the easiest part, remove the buffer, wipe out the buffer tube, maybe run a light coat of clp or what ever your favorite is, up in the tube, and a light lubing of the spring. (cleans crud and helps preserve the enclosed buffer tube from rust, and like I said, the easiest part to clean.



I'm not suggesting that my methods and frequency are better than other's here, but I know it works for me, and I actually enjoy meticously cleaning every component and lubing where required. Makes me feel good and warm and fuzzy.



Oh, one last thing, if you're going to store your hangun or rifle in a case, leave the zipper a quarter or more open, so moisture doesn't accumulate inside and possibly rust your weapon. You can also get the moisture absorbing silica ( the little bags about the size of a towelette) very cheap, and tossing a a couple in a gun case is just a few cent's cost, but a whole lot less worry.



The end.



J.
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Old January 23rd, 2012, 11:35 AM   #30
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http://pistol-traini...om/archives/649



Quote:
38,736 rounds2 stoppages, 0 malfunctions, 1 parts breakage



All good things, as they say



Quote:

During Week 20, we had the first parts breakage on the test gun. At round 37,427 the trigger spring broke. The gun still fired, but the shooter had to push the trigger forward manually for each shot.



The gun had not been cleaned in more than 7,500 rounds! The breakage occurred almost a thousand rounds into a very high-speed practice session.


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