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Cleaning Frequency for HD Gun

This is a discussion on Cleaning Frequency for HD Gun within the MP Reference forums, part of the Smith & Wesson MP Forum category; I found this on another board and thought the MP forum was a good place to ask.... Also, to remove the firing pin safety on ...


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Old January 23rd, 2012, 12:52 PM   #31
sdg
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I found this on another board and thought the MP forum was a good place to ask....



Quote:
Also, to remove the firing pin safety on the Glock you remove the slide back plate, remove the firing pin and extractor depressor plunger assembly and the extractor and the firing pin safety falls out. To remove the firing pin safety (firing pin block) from a S&W you have to remove the rear sight!


Is this true? And if so, when is this type of disassembly necessary?



Thanks,

Steve
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Old January 23rd, 2012, 01:00 PM   #32
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In my personal opinion, cleaning combat firearms after every range trip is akin to getting a car wash and fill-up after every run to 7-11. We use to do it too, but now we're a little more practical about it.



After every range trip we wipe them down with a silicone rag, run a snake through the bore a couple/few times, and lube the rails with Weapon Shield grease.

After 5,000 rounds or so our carry and competition M&P pistols get field stripped, bores are soaked in bore solvent and cleaned with jag and brush 'till they're spotless, slide is cleaned with solvent (dried w/air compressor) then the frame internals are cleaned with CLP spray, followed by the 7 point lube job (Weapon Shield oil w/WS grease on the sear and rails).

Once a year each one is completely stripped down and every part is thoroughly cleaned with rags and liquid solvent and the internals (except the striker channel) are lightly coated with CLP spray before the 7 point lube job.



For the record, our hunting rifles are a completely different story. They are cleaned, heavily oiled, and put away right after hunting season. Cleaned again and sighted in before the first hunting trip. We rarely go out hunting without sighting in and fouling the barrels first, but we thoroughly clean and lightly oil the barrels after each trip.
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Old January 24th, 2012, 03:24 AM   #33
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sdg View Post
I found this on another board and thought the MP forum was a good place to ask....







Is this true? And if so, when is this type of disassembly necessary?



Thanks,

Steve


I can't speak to the glock, but all of the handguns I've owned that had a "drop safety" required the rear sight to be removed to access the drop safety spring and plunger.



I've never seen any need to clean those parts. The manufacturer does not recommend that level of disassembly for cleaning. The parts are far enough away from the actual fireing that they do NOT get any significant carbon build-up, so they stay extremely clean.



All of my guns are relatively low round counts*, most around 5k-10k total rounds, and I've never had a problem with those components being dirty. The only time you really need to deal with those parts is if you're installing an aftermarket rear sight.



*That's low for a competition gun, and an insanely high relative to most carry / self defense guns.
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Old January 24th, 2012, 07:39 AM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Iram View Post
I can't speak to the glock, but all of the handguns I've owned that had a "drop safety" required the rear sight to be removed to access the drop safety spring and plunger.



I've never seen any need to clean those parts. The manufacturer does not recommend that level of disassembly for cleaning. The parts are far enough away from the actual fireing that they do NOT get any significant carbon build-up, so they stay extremely clean.



All of my guns are relatively low round counts*, most around 5k-10k total rounds, and I've never had a problem with those components being dirty. The only time you really need to deal with those parts is if you're installing an aftermarket rear sight.



*That's low for a competition gun, and an insanely high relative to most carry / self defense guns.
Thanks for the thorough response, that's exactly what I needed to know.
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Old January 24th, 2012, 08:21 AM   #35
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Originally Posted by KRWeiss View Post
In my personal opinion, cleaning combat firearms after every range trip is akin to getting a car wash and fill-up after every run to 7-11.


K - get off your lazy butt, run down to the 7-11 and get me a beer, then clean those weapons....



O.K., back to reality, I'm in the category that cleans every trip. But I wish I could somehow see how many people here that clean after every trip, as opposed to those who don't, are either retired military, like myself, or former military. I never even shot a hand gun until I enlisted. Fast forward to training, training and more training, and turning your weapons back into the armory dirty would be akin to kicking a Colonel in the cajones. You just don't do it. Unless you're incredibbly brave or incredibly stupid. It's ingrained into your brain. I'd almost bet, but could never prove it, unless we have a poll or something, that a lot of us that "just can't help ourselves, to clean our weapons after every run, fall into the former/retired military crowd. I'd be curious to know if my theory is correct or would break down, given some hard data.



Now, if you please, the weather's been nasty here, and my truck needs a wash, and could probably hold a half a tank, if you could get right on that? Thanks.



J.
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Old January 24th, 2012, 09:26 AM   #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sdg View Post
I found this on another board and thought the MP forum was a good place to ask....







Is this true? And if so, when is this type of disassembly necessary?



Thanks,

Steve


I'm not an armorer or smith, so I don't know for sure, but I can remove my firing pin without removing the rear site. Here's a YouTube video demonstrating the procedure. I don't know if any of this qualifies as removing the firing pin safety but here it is anyways:

[media]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L9GXtxmSRDk[/media]
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Old January 24th, 2012, 09:45 AM   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bdcheung View Post
I'm not an armorer or smith, so I don't know for sure, but I can remove my firing pin without removing the rear site. Here's a YouTube video demonstrating the procedure. I don't know if any of this qualifies as removing the firing pin safety but here it is anyways:


I think the firing pin safety is the Striker Block. The Striker Block is what prevents the firing pin from moving forward. The striker block definitively requires the removal of the rear sight. The video linked above is the remove of the fire pin/striker.
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Old January 24th, 2012, 12:32 PM   #38
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Originally Posted by super wabbit View Post
I think the firing pin safety is the Striker Block. The Striker Block is what prevents the firing pin from moving forward. The striker block definitively requires the removal of the rear sight. The video linked above is the remove of the fire pin/striker.


Gotcha. Yes, I do know that you need to remove the rear sight to remove the striker block.
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Old March 9th, 2012, 06:16 PM   #39
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I field strip and clean each range trip. Guess that was what I was taught in the Army. Besides don't you enjoy spending quality time with your pistol? If you needed to use it in a desperate situation wouldn't you prefer it be clean? I was taught if you take care of it, it will take care of you. We are not talking about making sure your potted plants are watered.
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Old March 21st, 2012, 06:40 AM   #40
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I used to love cleaning my gun after EVERY range trip when I first purchased it. Anymore though, I can't really stand it! Maybe I'm too detailed with the cleaning? It's just gotten so boring for me.



That goes to say, if I know that I'm going to the range a couple times in a month's time or so, I'll leave it dirty. I'm never shooting more than 100rnds per range trip though. I spend most of my range time with my M&P 15-22 plinker!
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Old March 21st, 2012, 07:06 AM   #41
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bdcheung View Post
I'm not an armorer or smith, so I don't know for sure, but I can remove my firing pin without removing the rear site. Here's a YouTube video demonstrating the procedure. I don't know if any of this qualifies as removing the firing pin safety but here it is anyways:

[media]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L9GXtxmSRDk[/media]


As with many things on You Tube, not everything is accurate. This video says that after removing the "firing pin"(it is called a striker) you can then clean and lubricate it. WRONG! You should clean it but you should NOT lubricate it. You should also clean the striker channel but not lubricate it. I've also seen better videos on You Tube dealing with the striker removal. This guy doesn't seem to really have the experience to make a video. Too much fumbling around with the striker and the "button" (striker block is the correct term). His fumbling trying to replace the striker makes the entire drill seem much harder than it really is.
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Old July 1st, 2012, 08:32 PM   #42
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I clean every range trip. Don't you enjoy "quality time" with you pistols?
Guess my habit comes from the Military.
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Old July 1st, 2012, 10:32 PM   #43
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just dont over clean the bore, people over use the metal brushes and cause un needed wear!
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Old August 3rd, 2012, 06:09 AM   #44
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Just remember the most important aspect of a HD gun: RELIABILITY.
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Old September 19th, 2012, 09:08 PM   #45
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AZM&P View Post
I clean mine every trip I enjoy doing it for the most part but I do skip a few days after the range sometimes as well
What he said....Exactly right. Don't you like spending quality time with your pistols?
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