9mm Shield slide lock - can't release it :( - Page 3 - MP-Pistol Forum

9mm Shield slide lock - can't release it :(

This is a discussion on 9mm Shield slide lock - can't release it :( within the MP SHIELD Pistols forums, part of the Smith & Wesson MP Forum category; Originally Posted by Mk12mod1 I see that a lot of you prefer the slingshot. However, I am determined to use the slide stop as a ...


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Old May 11th, 2017, 11:22 AM   #31
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Originally Posted by Mk12mod1 View Post
I see that a lot of you prefer the slingshot. However, I am determined to use the slide stop as a slide release. I have 1000 rounds through it and still can not release the slide with the button.
Could anyone offer detailed advice on how I can make that work?
I've ruined more than a few things with my ham-handed attempts to "improve" them, so take this with a grain of salt.

My Shield arrived with a slide ####### that required two thumbs to drop the slide which offended my sense of propriety. I checked the slide stop and the notch in the slide and couldn't see any burrs or anything that would obviously impede the proper (as countenanced by GAWD and John Browning) release of the slide. Dragging my fingernail across the surfaces, it became apparent that the surfaces were slightly rough.

I figured a little polishing was in order, so I took a popsicle stick and rubbed some Flitz metal polish into its narrow edge and manually raised the slide stop and sawed away on its bearing surface until it was bright and shiny.

Boom, the slide stop is now a slide release.

If you've got burrs, you'll probably have to go the sandpaper/stone route, but the chances that you'll screw up the engagement angles, making the hold open function not work anymore, increase so...
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Old May 13th, 2017, 01:04 PM   #32
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To each their own, but i prefer to slingshot and never use the slide stop as a slide release. If i did use the slide stop as a release, that would mean that my hand would have to change position from a positive grip of the gun to release the slide using the lever.
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Old May 13th, 2017, 03:41 PM   #33
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The slingshot method is a well-established method to reliably return the slide to battery; lots of slide real estate for the support hand to grasp.

However the method has one short coming for those who choose to simply "come over the top" to manipulate the slide, the back of their hand prevents the operator from viewing the breech; the old adage, whether pistol or carbine, "watch it load, know its loaded". Just rotating the strong hand 45 degrees will allow the breech to in full view to observe the round being properly chambered as the slide is sling shotted; not important on the range but is critical if you will be stepping out from behind cover to engage a down range threat. The same is true for carbine reloads, make a habit of rotating the rifle so you can watch the round chamber as you depress the bolt catch.

The subconscious mind knows correct repetition.

Caution: Pseudo-science may be embedded in this post.
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Old May 13th, 2017, 05:43 PM   #34
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mp9, whatever works for you, go with it. I really dont want to argue the point of theories with you. But please let me say... if you`re "watchin it load", your not watchin the bad guy.
If i have to watch my gun load, that means i dont trust my weapon to do what its supposed to do. A good weapon should never need a set of eyes watching it.

And let me add... my gun is ready long before i would EVER step out in front of the bad guy... just sayin

Last edited by PaPow; May 13th, 2017 at 05:45 PM.
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Old May 14th, 2017, 08:32 AM   #35
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We are still discussing slide manipulation, just no levers involved.

Some may be interested in learning about subtle differences regarding the manner that their pistol support hand can grasp the slide to perform an immediate reload:

1. using an “over-the-top” grip on the rear of the slide, the user grasps the slide between the four fingers and their palm, such a grip blocks the view of the breech. It’s also awkward if a pistol optic is mounted.

2. pinching the rear of the slide between the support thumb and index finger combined with a slight cant by the strong hand causes the support hand to get out of the line of sight to breech, affording an unobstructed view of the breech loading to the operator.

One method is not quicker than the other, one just affords the operator a higher degree of certainty that the top round in the magazine is not crooked from the impact of being loaded etc., as well as the chamber was indeed loaded.


Some may find the following video demonstrations of interest.

Reload Time

At 1:19 & 1:41 the orientation of the hands and slide is shown with momentary glance of the eyes to the breech.
Immediate Reload



Regardless of method chosen if cover is available and its being properly used there is no view of the down range threat during a reload; this highlights the importance of having the gun properly loaded and in a firearm presentation with sights aligned Before stepping out from behind cover. This practical application of this Principle is well demonstrated during this One-Hand Reload.


Amateurs practice to do it correctly, professionals practice to never get it wrong.

Caution: Pseudo-science and / or amateur graphics may be embedded in this post.
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Old May 14th, 2017, 08:39 AM   #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mp9werks View Post
We are still discussing slide manipulation, just no levers involved.

Some may be interested in learning about subtle differences regarding the manner that their pistol support hand can grasp the slide to perform an immediate reload:

1. using an “over-the-top” grip on the rear of the slide, the user grasps the slide between the four fingers and their palm, such a grip blocks the view of the breech. It’s also awkward if a pistol optic is mounted.

2. pinching the rear of the slide between the support thumb and index finger combined with a slight cant by the strong hand causes the support hand to get out of the line of sight to breech, affording an unobstructed view of the breech loading to the operator.

One method is not quicker than the other, one just affords the operator a higher degree of certainty that the top round in the magazine is not crooked from the impact of being loaded etc., as well as the chamber was indeed loaded.


Some may find the following video demonstrations of interest.

Reload Time

At 1:19 & 1:41 the orientation of the hands and slide is shown with momentary glance of the eyes to the breech.
Immediate Reload



Regardless of method chosen if cover is available and its being properly used there is no view of the down range threat during a reload; this highlights the importance of having the gun properly loaded and in a firearm presentation with sights aligned Before stepping out from behind cover. This practical application of this Principle is well demonstrated during this One-Hand Reload.


Amateurs practice to do it correctly, professionals practice to never get it wrong.

Caution: Pseudo-science and / or amateur graphics may be embedded in this post.
mp9werks, YOU sir, are a human encyclopedia...lol
I dont see how you can make a "crooked magazine" work properly, they only go in one way... but anyhow... carry on...lol

Last edited by PaPow; May 14th, 2017 at 08:42 AM.
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Old May 14th, 2017, 02:41 PM   #37
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The magazine is never crooked, as you say, it can only be introduced straight guided by the sidewalls of the magwell.

During the reloading process of semi-autos, hand and fore-finger orientation on the magazine to be inserted is the First Step of making sure the bullet nose is properly oriented and properly held by the magazine lips.

The devil is the spring-loaded top round in the magazine being precariously held by just the magazine lips that can be slightly dislodged by the act of magazine insertion, making even the most accommodating feed ramp / bullet nose design suddenly the operators worst friend. When the round is not perfectly secured by the magazine lips, once the slide is released (levers or slingshot) the slide pawl will drive between the lips and either push the round into the chamber or totally push the round obliquely and thus the round jamming between the breech face and some where off center of the feed ramp. Visually checking the top round AFTER the magazine has been inserted is the important Second Step.

A civilian and even most law enforcement personnel will never be required to perform an immediate reload at the speed of human reaction time; however, those that may will find these nuances of technique to serve them well in time of need.

Last edited by mp9werks; May 14th, 2017 at 02:59 PM.
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Old May 14th, 2017, 09:46 PM   #38
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PaPow I use the slingshot method also because it simplifies movements that I need to employ to clear jams etc'. Yes it's slower and I accept that, but it's surer when considering everything. One makes the choice for oneself. When under stress gross movements work best. That's not even up for debate, it's been proven time after time in countless scenarios. I was trained that way in the military and that training sticks.

In the M&P it's a slide stop and not a release. Trying to confuse the issue by introducing designs having a slide release has no bearing on the M&P. They are other designs (I love the 1911). When I used a 1911 I used the over the top to clear jams and the slide release as appropriate, but the over the top slingshot method would have worked for both and I was in the process of converting over to over the top slingshot for everything for the 1911. I surprised a trainer by doing that and getting the 1911 back into action incredibly rapidly. He didn't say anything but i knew he registered surprise; I saw it.

With the M&P 9C if I need more than 12 rounds I'm in some really deep doo-doo and by then I've found cover if I'm being me. I might even be digging out my carbine (or the bear spray) and unfolding it to put it into action. I'd be one sorry Sad Sack if I ever found myself away from cover if I knew something was coming down... there is no substitute for situational awareness. I could never be that involved in anything to be unaware of what's going on around me to find myself in that situation. It just can't happen, maybe if I have alzheimers, but that's not in the foreseeable future.

Last edited by BrianK; May 14th, 2017 at 09:51 PM.
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Old May 15th, 2017, 12:13 PM   #39
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During a reload, I normally come across the top of the slide to retract it and chamber a round. That being said, I also practice using the slide lock lever to release the slide, but NOT with my shooting hand, but rather, with my support hand, so that I don't need to adjust my grip.

My support hand inserts the fresh mag, comes up into the grip support position and the thumb of my support hand presses the lever, releasing the slide. I can do this quicker than sling-shotting the slide and as mentioned above, no repositioning of my shooting hand is required. I've shown this method to my friends that prefer using a 'slide release' rather than slingshot and they have all adopted the 'support thumb release' technique on all their pistols.

As a side note... I bought my Shield in May of 2012 when they 1st came out. It has well over 15K rounds through it, with no appreciable wear to the Slide/Slide Lock components.
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